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Midwest Survivor's Journey to Freedom

Selah Freedom changed my life in more ways than one. Before coming to Selah Freedom, I was, as I like to say it, a feral cat. I hated everything and everyone. I would fight back and run from the slightest glimpse of kindness and love. All I kept telling the staff at Selah was, "you don't know me so why the heck do you love me?" I would cower from their love. I came from the streets. I lived in a rundown camper and under bridges. My trafficker was a drug dealer. I didn't know love or kindness. Selah just met me, so why would they love me? All I knew was flight or fight, and that is all I have ever done my whole life. 

 

The thing about Selah Freedom is that they NEVER give up or turn their backs on anyone. I am surprised that they didn't give up on me because I was vile and mean to the staff. They fought for me and loved me. They fed love into my soul. I was at Selah Freedom THREE times, so that proves that they don't give up. I came back to Selah Freedom the third time after watching my son get abused. That's a mother’s worst nightmare. I reached out to Selah Freedom and explained everything to them, and they welcomed me back with open arms. 

 

I knew what I was about to receive. I knew what was at stake if I didn't go back. I was still a feral cat, but after meeting the staff, participating in a few therapy sessions, and being one-on-one with the staff, I started to settle down.

 

They taught me how to love myself, accept myself and be who I truly am. I even cried a few times there, which is a big deal for me because I NEVER cried. Selah Freedom taught me that it’s OK to cry. It’s OK to feel emotions. Selah Freedom walked with me through this journey of being the better version of myself. And I did it. While at Selah Freedom, my parents told me they were proud of me. I am now in my late twenties, and that is the first time they have spoken those words to me. That's how I know I have made it in the world. 

 

After leaving Selah Freedom, I moved back home to live at my mom’s sober living house. This was the first time I was back in the city I was trafficked in. By that time, I had five years of sobriety under my belt. I became the president of the sober living house; I had my son back and I became the assistant manager at an ice cream shop – the first and longest real job I've ever had. Now, I work at a senior living facility.


 

I live with my parents now, which I never thought would happen because of all the things I've done and said to them. I wouldn't have the relationship with my family if it weren’t for Selah Freedom. My siblings were never interested in doing anything with me, but now they ask me to go for car rides, go to the movies and go shopping with them. My dad and I talk a lot more than we did before. My mom helps me out financially now if I am ever low on gas or want to take the kids somewhere. All I can say about Selah Freedom is that they helped this little feral cat become a better person. I see the light in everything now. I accept and love everything now. I communicate instead of using my claws and rude words now. Honestly, Selah Freedom helped me save myself. In my opinion, the world would be a better place if everyone took a little Selah.